Shooting from the Dark Side

I am running a bit late to post for the Imagecraft Bootcamp last week’s challenge.

If you didn’t know yet, every Wednesday, Mitch Zeissler hosts the Imagecraft Bootcamp simultaneously at his blog Exploratorius and here at the Photo Rehab.

Mitch gave us a tough challenge. In his words: ..this post is all about shooting from the dark side of a subject… the shadowed side… the side opposite from the light source… the side that we are specifically cautioned against shooting from by camera manuals (or at least we used to be).  This is also known as contre-jour and backlit photography.

Well, I used a photo that it was stored as rejected at my LightRoom catalogue. I shot it last summer, right after the sunrise.

I followed Mitch’s wise guidance, curious to see what the results would be.

Here is the original photo.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here is the post processed photo in color. I adjusted it first (auto tone; lens correction; sharening; color correction; graduated filter; radial filter) before cropping.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I converted it to Black and White.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The featured image is the black & white version, after I applied an antique filter using Silver Efex Pro2.

Please visit Mitch’s post to learn how to do the same. Or check his post  here at this blog.

Thank you.

30 thoughts on “Shooting from the Dark Side

  1. Beautiful! My favourite is the featured image. 🙂 You thought you were running late… My post won’t be up until Sunday. lol This Imagecraft Bootcamp inspired me to shoot from the dark side all week long for my project 365. Today was the fifth day I shot toward the light. It’s been fun in Lightroom (not so much fun shooting outside in the cold).

    • this is an excerpt from t The Miniaturist, the book I told you about. I was reading this when your post popped up.
      ” Nella sees the hundreds of ships moored. their bodies spanning down long tapering jetties belonging to the VOC. … Most of the masts are naked, and the rigging and sails foldedaway, protected from the elements until it is their time to be freshly oiled and drawn up and stretched across the wood
      Those ships that have sails look as if they are in bloom, ready to catch the trade winds …..”

      Thanks Lucille, your photos really helped bring this text to life for me!

      • Thank you, Leanne, for sharing. I’m going to share with you a photo of a replica of the VOC ship, which is in front of the Dutch Maritime Museum.
        I’m so happy with your comment! It’s much nicer to share photos when they say something to those who look at it. Thank you!

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